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Episode 001: My First Period

EPISODE 001.
MY FIRST PERIOD | TRANSCRIPT

[00:00:09]

Sasha: You're listening to the Red Tales. The Red by Modibodi Podcast, which candidly celebrates the messy and iconic parts of our teenage years and our bodies. From juggling, changing friendship groups, dealing with first heartbreaks, and waking up to changing body parts, our teenagers are filled with the most defining and often cringe worthy moments of our lives. Luckily, we're not alone. Red by Modibodi is sustainable, easy to use period underwear for tweens and teens. It gives us the best protection against period leaks and stains, so we can ditch pads and get on with living our best lives. I'm Sasha Meaney, your host, and every fortnight, I'll be joined by a young Aussie who isn't afraid to open up about the all too relatable moments from their teenage years and how they lived to tell the tale.

A memorable moment for every person who bleeds, the moment they get their first period. Some of us were lucky enough to get it while we were safe at home in the comfort of our own bathroom. Others weren't quite as lucky. The first time I got my period, I actually pulled down my underwear and I screamed, like a Macaulay Culkin Home Alone type of scream. My mom came running into the room as if someone had died, and I told her I had my period. She just laughed at me. She gave me a pad and she left. I remember being in shock. All she kept saying was that she was going to throw a traditional Sri Lankan party and celebrate me becoming a woman. She texted her friends to tell them the good news, and I was just sitting there thinking I am literally pouring blood from my vagina.

Someone else who understands the anxiety of getting a period for the first time is 18-year-old Pratha Nagpal. Today, Pratha shares her tale about the first time she got her period in an unexpected and very public way.

[00:02:05]

Pratha: I think I was really excited to get my period because all my friends had gotten their period and they were all talking about it all the time. They were like, "Oh, yes, finally it happened." And I was the only person going like, "Oh, wait, this hasn't happened for me yet." Everyone was getting their periods for the first time, and it was like a first experience. I guess I just wanted to have that experience.

I remember being in class one day and one of my friends going, "Hey, I just got my period. And I was like, "No way. No way. I was supposed to get my period." [laughs] That was like one moment when I distinctly remember being very angry about not getting my period. A few months later, I guess I was in school and I felt this icky feeling. It was so unknown to me, so I just let it be. I was just like, "Oh, that's probably nothing." That period ends and I've done nothing. I've not going to the toilet or anything. I'm with friends having a good time, waiting for the next class and I stand up and there's a huge red stain on my white uniform. All these boys are looking at me and I'm like, "Whoa, what's going on? Am I looking cute today?" I think 12-year-old Pratha was so confident, but little did she know…

Two of my friends came running to me and they were like, "Pratha, there's a big stain on your skirt." I was like, "Oh, my God." Kind of happy but also very embarrassed. I was like, "Finally it's happening, but I didn't want it to happen this way." I remember they were like, "Let's go to the toilet right now." And they were following me really closely so no one else could actually see that stain.

I just went in to the toilet. I had never used a pad or knew how to use one. So, they handed me one and they were like, "You know how to do this?" I was like, "Yeah, of course. Of course, I know." I played with him for a second. I feel like I can imagine if you're watching a YouTube video and a girlfriend hands their boyfriend a pad and they're like, "What is this?" While I was doing that, my friends were buying me a new skirt because my skirt was completely ruined. I don't think I got it right.

I grew up in India and period still is such a taboo conversation. There's not much education about it in schools, but I went back home and I was like, "Mom, this happened today. I'm just so embarrassed to go into class tomorrow. What's going to happen?" But being like, "It's okay. It's fine." She sat me down and explained to me everything. I was like, "Mom, you could have come one day before and we would have been good." Afterwards it became a very normal routine thing. When everyone had had their first periods, everyone was just like, "okay, now this becomes the norm."

Interestingly, tampons were not that big a thing in India. I moved to Australia when I was 14, I think, and it was after that when I was like, "Tampons, diva cups, period underwear, la, so many things." I know a bit about period products, but I usually just use pads. I think what you're introduced to in the beginning is what, again, becomes your comfort thing. Mostly what I knew was through my friends and once I had gotten my period, that's when I had a conversation with my mom and that's when she was like, "Hey, this is how you use period products and you'll probably have cramps. You'll have some symptoms before and come to me for help you need and anything that you feel is wrong, and then, yeah, we'll go from there."

I have a sister and as we've grown up, the conversation about periods has become more normal than it was when we were growing up. I think when I was younger, I was so scared to be in front of my parents and be like, "Hey, I just got my period." I would go to my mom and be like, "Mom, I just got my period." But now it's kind of just like, "Hey, I have my period right now. I'm cranky." If I'm being really moody that day, then I'm like, "Dad, it's because I'm on my period."

Now, I'm so much more open to different stuff. Even diva cups and period underwear, all that, I think they're so much more sustainable than pads and tampons. Pads and tampons create so much waste and to help not do that for the rest of my life, or the rest of the time that I do, I'm going to get periods.

I think one funny thing is that whenever I’ve told my dad to buy pads or something, it's always like, I get a call and he's like, "Which ones?" And I'm like, "Oh, this is going to be hard to explain over the phone. Next time I'll show you which ones."

I guess this is embarrassing for me just in my space. I wake up with the stain every time I have my period. I've stained so many mattresses, and it's so embarrassing because if I have to sell them or just get rid of them, people are like, "What is that thing?" And I'm like, "You know what? it's a period stain." Got to be real.

What I would say to my younger self about a lot of things, it would be, "It's not that big of a deal as you think it is." Also, I would say that it shouldn't be that embarrassing. Periods are such a normal thing about your body and that they can become such a big part of womanhood for people, for women. Just embracing that and celebrating it because literally, it's the reason we're all here. So, not being embarrassed by that and not being so ashamed of talking about it or having a stain and being in front of boys or anything like that. Just celebrating what it is.

[00:08:54]

Sasha: As you start to learn more about the different changes your body goes through, we bet you'll hear a lot of quirky names for the term period. Some people call it the crimson tide, code red, the time of the month, shark week and even Aunt Flo. At Red by Modibodi, we love having a chuckle at period slang, but we also believe in normalizing the conversation around periods. Why? Well, periods of simply a natural part of your reproductive cycle, and they are just as normal as eating, sleeping, and breathing. They're also a wonderful sign that your body is healthy, maturing and functioning as it should. We shouldn't be afraid to call it by its name and talk about it openly without feeling ashamed or embarrassed.

But what are periods exactly and why oh why do they show up every month? Well, friends, it's actually quite a fascinating process. Every month the lining of your uterus gets thicker. This lining is called the endometrium. Your hormones then signal your ovaries to release an egg into the fallopian tubes. This process is called ovulation. When an egg is fertilized by a man's sperm, it results in pregnancy. But if the egg isn't fertilized by a sperm, your body will shed the lining of the uterus through your vagina and appear as blood.

This marks the start of your period and is known as day one of your menstrual cycle. The average cycle is 28 days, which typically means that you get your period every 28 days, but your periods can fluctuate depending on your hormones. You may end up missing a period or it may arrive later than usual. It normally takes one to two years before you get a regular cycle. The average time you bleed is normally four to five days, but it can often be shorter or longer. Although it may seem like you're losing a lot of blood in the early days of your period, you'll only lose an average four tablespoons of blood.

If you haven't got your period for the first time yet, you can prepare for it by asking somebody you trust to teach you how to use pads, tampons, or even better, a pair of period underwear. If you've already got your period, but aren't sure when it's going to come next, you can pack a pair of period underwear in your school bag or locker, so it's ready to grab whenever you need it.

Remember, friends, our bodies are unique and that often means we experience change at different times. You may be someone who gets their period a lot earlier than some of your friends. Or you may hear about everyone else getting their period and feel left behind. Whatever camp you fall in, know that there's nothing wrong with you and getting your period is not a race. Sooner or later, we'll all end up in the exact same boat. So, if you ever have any concerns about getting your period, please don't be afraid to talk to somebody that you trust, who can help you consult a medical professional.

Thanks for listening to The Red Tales, the RED by Modibodi Podcast. If you enjoyed tuning into today's episode, related a bit too much to the story, or learn something new, please subscribe to our podcast and leave us a review. If you're curious about how RED by Modibodi underwear protects you against period lakes and you'd love to give it a try, visit the RED by Modibodi website at modibodi.com/red.

You can even join the Red squad by signing up on our website to receive exclusive VIP offers. Because you've tuned in to our podcast today, we're giving you a special offer that's exclusive only to our podcast listeners. Simply use our special code, PODCAST, and you'll get a 10% discount on any RED product, excluding bundles.

Lastly, to keep up with all things RED, make sure to follow us on Instagram @RedbyModibodi. Remember, life is messy, but your period doesn't have to be.

End of Audio [00:12:48]

Episode 002: My First Heartbreak

EPISODE 002.
MY FIRST HEARTBREAK | TRANSCRIPT

[00:00:09]
Sasha: You're listening to the Red Tales, the Red by Modibodi Podcast, which candidly celebrates the messy and iconic parts of our teenage years and our bodies. From juggling changing friendship groups, dealing with first heartbreaks, and waking up to changing body parts, our teenage years are filled with the most defining and often cringe worthy moments of our lives. Luckily, we're not alone. Red by Modibodi is sustainable, easy to use period underwear for tweens and teens. It gives us the best protection against period leaks and stains, so we can ditch pads and get on with living our best lives. I'm Sasha Meaney, your host, and every fortnight I'll be joined by a young Aussie who isn't afraid to open up about the all too relatable moments from their teenage years and how they lived to tell the tale.

They say you never forget your first love, but for many of us, it is the sting of first heartbreak that sticks around for even longer. I was completely boy mad in high school. I'm curious in everything that I do and romance was no exception. The first time I felt truly heartbroken, I was in Year Nine. I had a massive crush on my best friend for a year, and then when we eventually started dating, I was over the moon. I was so invested in the relationship and I threw myself into all those warm glowy feelings, completely blind, and trusting. But after a month, it became obvious that he wasn't feeling any sparks towards me. Eventually, I just flat out asked if he changed his mind. He had. I was gutted and cried for ages. I don't think I ever stopped caring about him until a whole year later.

It changed the way I viewed myself in future relationships because I was left wondering, is that how feelings work? Would future friends or boyfriends just all of a sudden change their mind about me and it would be over? And to be honest, I still care about that experience, but this time, it's different. When I look back, I'm proud of myself for wearing my heart on my sleeve, and being brave enough to talk about my feelings, even if it meant getting my heart broken.

Thankfully, I'm not alone in suffering heartache during my formative years, as it turns out, very few of us are. Today, 23-year-old Tiffany Wong shares the tale of when she got her heartbroken.

[00:02:49]
Tiffany: I was in year nine, so I think I was about 14 years old. I was a bit of a nerd. I went one day to support my school at a debating tournament and I didn't actually have a debate that day. I was just supporting the school and my friend's sister. After the debate, I was just there with my friend and then I saw a boy in a cadet uniform, and I was like, "Oh, I've never seen, never spoken to a boy that did cadets." And I was like, "Okay, I'll just go up to him and spoke to him." We bonded over the fact that he also didn't have a debating tournament that day. He was supporting his sister, and that we both recently did Da Vinci Decathlon, which is an academic gala day. So, we were both very nerdy. We had a lot in common, not really, but at the time, it felt like a lot.

Essentially, we added each other on Facebook. We just talked online, didn't really know what to do, and then one day we decided to try and meet up, but he had never really gone outside properly. I went to Chatswood library and he went to Gordon library, but he didn't have a phone that had mobile data. I thought I was stood up and it was like tragic, but it was fine. And then we talked online and it was fine, and we kept going on like that. Then one day, he decided he was going to make me something on Minecraft. He rewrote my name into like the blocks, and then he posted on Facebook. Then I was like, "Oh, what's going on? It's public on Facebook. Oh, everyone thinks we're dating." But I was like, "What does this mean? Does he like me?" Because at the time I was liking him.

Then it was actually Valentine's Day. I was sitting in Latin class, and then my year coordinator came to knock on our door and she's like, "Tiffany, I have something for you." And turns out this guy had sent me a bunch of long stemmed roses, but it didn't have his name on it. On the note it was like, "Tiffany, have a great day. Smiley face." I was like, "Who sent this to me? I don't know." I was really confused. I was like, "I have a great idea." I took a photo with these roses, and then posted on to Facebook and he was the first person to like them, so I was like, "I knew it. This guy sent them to me."

So I was like, "I'm pretty sure he likes me. It makes sense." He's always asking if there's anything he can help me with. He revealed to me accidentally that he had been stalking my Tumblr, so I was like, "This is it." It went on for a really, really, really long time, and we also like went on to like Model UN camps where there's plenty of opportunity to just sneak in a little kiss or something or hold hands, but it never happened. Then we had like a little drama because he was talking to my best friend at this Model UN camp, but not talking to me and it was like, drama.

One day, we just started drifting apart. There wasn't really anything that brought it on. There are specific moments I remember, we went to another debating tournament. I was telling my friend, "Oh, this person and I used to talk every single day, and we're not talking anymore." Then we went up to him and I was like, "Hey, what's up? How are you? How's your debating?" And then he just said, was like, "Hi." And then just didn't talk to me. I was there awkwardly with my friend and we had just both been ignored.

It was really, really weird and it kept going again. We also had different-- this went for a whole year, right? I was really like, "I don't know what's going on. He hasn't talked to me for a few months." And then suddenly, as well, I got a text being like, "Tiffany, pls come to formal with me." I was being like, "What is going on? You don't want to talk to me, you're inviting me to your formal." It was just so confusing, and it felt like everything I was doing was futile. If you send your message, you got a one word answer, like, "k,"

I felt like I was putting all this effort and energy into trying to keep contact with someone who was just not wanting to keep contact back. It was just like really, really confusing, and I was like, "Is it me? Is it something I've done? Is it him? Has he just changed and doesn't want to be friends anymore? Was it his friends? Have they said something?" Because when we were there with his friends, his friends kept teasing him about it and I was just like, "I don't know what's going on." I shed a few tears. It wasn't a huge sob because it wasn't like something had broken, it was just like something drifting apart and you just don't really know how to deal with that.

I just spent a lot of time wishing a lot of things. I would think like a specific moment made him turn off and not want to talk to me anymore. Or I'll be like, "Maybe I'm not smart enough. Maybe I'm just not good enough. Maybe I'm not all these things." Essentially, yeah. It just was at a point where I was like, "There's nothing I can do about it. I don't really know how to interpret the whole situation." What I did at the time was trying to write a story about it. I wasn't much of a writer, but I tried to write about him. It was just good to have all of my feelings like on a page, just being like, "They're valid." Because I think that's one of the hard things is, when you have a lot of emotion, and no one else seems to be going through the same thing as you, you don't really know what that means. Just having them on the page just made it like, "Oh, okay, it's legit. I'm actually having these feelings and that sort of thing."

Yeah, it was just really bizarre because it wasn't like he was at my school. No one really knew who this guy was. So, I was just having to process it by myself. When all this heartbreak was happening, I was in year nine, so I still had to go to school and that sort of thing. But just being with friends was good because it was just, you're actually going out and doing things. Some people, they actually need to take time off and just do self-care by themselves. At that age I was like, "I don't know what self-care is." It was just good to have a distraction for a little bit. I was still being really active in the school community, doing debating, doing all of rowing, and that sort of thing. It was really intense, but it just meant I was actually doing stuff for myself.

I mean, in hindsight, if I the similar thing happened to me right now, I'll probably have to actually take time off. It's a really heavy burden. You don't really know. It's just so much feeling that you just need to sit. It's just weird. I think a lot of people have different coping mechanisms and mine would just be like, "You need to take time off and sit and think about what's happening." And then just be like, "Okay, that happened. I'm going to carry that a little bit every day, but it doesn't mean I have to like stop and do everything."

I am a little bit of an amateur songwriter. I do write songs about people. I haven't actually written one for a whole year because I've started dating someone, hello. Essentially, I would write. Writing is just a way to just have your emotions out there. I also cry a lot, but I think crying is really good and I purposely watch sad films or happy films just to make sure I'm emoting because I think bottling your emotions in isn't good for you. With regards to my first heartbreak, it just meant like, writing. I guess, I was the first person in my group to have any of the super negative emotion about a crush, essentially. It was just good to talk about it, but it just meant I was having that difficulty with my friends because they didn't really know what that was. That's why it's good to, you write it, you read it and you're like, "okay, it seems silly, but it's legit to me."

I think rejection as well. When you get older, so I'm 23 now and you get a lot of rejection from jobs. I'm also in acting, so I get a lot of rejection at casting calls and it's right to your face. In a sense, you have to build up that thick skin. You don't really want to, but you have to. It's obviously different when it comes to relationship, it really pierces through that because someone is rejecting you, for you rather than you for your ability. It's the same thing that you're like, "Okay, it's just happened and now we have to take a deep breath and move on."

If I were talking to my younger self, I'd probably be like, "This is your first heartbreak and there's going to be plenty more to come." Which is really sad when you think about it, but it's true. At year nine, I was so young and I was pinning all these hopes on this one dude who would never really speak again. Then you get to 18 and then you have another boyfriend and it's more serious and then you've got more heartbreaks. While you're young, just try and enjoy yourself. It's probably really cliché to say, but just learn from all your experiences. It's going to be your first heartbreak. It's going to be your first like, holding hand, your first kiss, that sort of thing. You just got to learn from it, and then when you're older, hopefully, meet someone that you get along better with.

But even now, I'm dating this guy at the moment. I'm like, "It's great. It's going really well." We've been dating for seven months, but it doesn't mean that we're going to spend the rest of our life together. I think it was really difficult to deal with. So, I had this like whole picture that I was going to be a Disney princess and you find that one Prince Charming, and then you live with him forever. I think at a certain age, I was like, "It doesn't really happen like that." Once I accepted that, I was able to enjoy dating, and then be more free and I didn't feel so restricted. I didn't feel like, "Oh, I have to find the one."

[00:13:45]
Sasha: Let's be real, rejection hurts. When you finally collect the courage to tell someone you like them and they don't like you back, it can feel like the end of the world. You spent all this time and emotional energy fantasizing about what it would be like to be with this person, only to get a big fat no. Ouch. Whether you've recently gotten rejected or have yet to go through the ups and downs of young love, it's really important to know that rejection will happen to everybody. Literally, everybody. Even the person you admire from afar who looks like they've got it all, has been rejected before and will be rejected again. We promise it's not all bleak gloom and doom.

In fact, the future is 100% bright. When it comes to rejection, the way we react is as unique as our fingerprint. Some of us may feel like crying, throwing up, we may vent to our best friend over a whole tub of ice cream, or we'll bury our head under the pillow. Or if you're like me, you'll lock yourself in your room and you'll declare very loudly that you're never ever, ever going to pursue romantic affection of anyone else ever again. As tough as it is, rejection is an inevitable part of life and applies to more than just our high school crush.

We can get rejected when we try out for the football team. We might run for school captain and lose to someone else. We may apply for a Christmas casual job and not even get a callback. It can happen anytime you put yourself out there in unfamiliar territory and scream, "Here I am. Take me or leave me." Yes, rejection and heartbreak are definitely inevitable. What makes rejection worse is that we feel like there's something wrong with us. We believe that if someone doesn't pick us, it must be because we're not smart enough, good looking enough, qualified enough, or just plain not good enough. These thoughts are normal, but we shouldn't believe them.

The most important thing to know about getting rejected is that it's usually not about you, and it doesn't reflect your worth as a person. Just because your crush doesn't like you back doesn't mean you're not pretty enough. Just because you didn't get the job you wanted or get into the football team, doesn't mean that you're not smart or talented enough. Know this, friends, you're more than the person who didn't like you back. You're more than the number of workplaces that have said no. You're more than the number of times you were rejected as a teenager.

What's important about getting rejected is that you were brave enough to go after it in the first place. You were brave enough to tell someone that you cared about them. You were brave enough to apply for the job or try out for the team. You were brave enough to step up and be a leader.

The world needs more brave people who dare to go after what they want. So, if you've been rejected recently, we are super proud of you, and we encourage you to keep being brave. After all, just because it didn't work out this time, doesn't mean it won't work out in the future.

Thanks for listening to The Red Tales, the Red by Modibodi Podcast. If you enjoyed tuning in today’s episode, related a bit too much to the story, or learnt something new, please subscribe to our podcast and leave us a review. If you're curious about how Red by Modibodi underwear protects you against periods leaks, and you'd love to give it a try, visit the Red by Modibodi website at modibodi.com/red. You can even join the red squad by signing up on our website to receive exclusive VIP offers.

Because you've tuned in to our podcast today, we're giving you a special offer that's exclusive only to our podcast listeners. Simply use our special code, PODCAST, and you'll get a 10% discount on any Red product excluding bundles. Lastly, to keep up with all things Red, make sure to follow us on Instagram @RedbyModibodi. Remember, life is messy, but your period doesn't have to be.

End of Audio [00:17:56]

Episode 003: My First Breakout

EPISODE 003.
MY FIRST BREAKOUT | TRANSCRIPT

[00:00:09]

Sasha: You're listening to the Red Tales, the Red by Modibodi Podcast, which candidly celebrates the messy and iconic parts of our teenage years and our bodies. From juggling changing friendship groups, dealing with first heartbreaks, and waking up to changing body parts, our teenage years are filled with the most defining and often cringe worthy moments of our lives. Luckily, we're not alone. Red by Modibodi is sustainable, easy to use period underwear for tweens and teens. It gives us the best protection against period leaks and stains, so we can ditch pads and get on with living our best lives. I'm Sasha Meaney, your host, and every fortnight I'll be joined by a young Aussie who isn't afraid to open up about the all too relatable moments from their teenage years and how they lived to tell the tale.

Picture this: you've just woken up, headed into the bathroom to get ready for school and all of a sudden, you see that you've sprouted that bright red pimple the size of Jupiter, smack dab in the middle of your forehead. As we get older, it is normal to get pimples and breakouts across your face, back, and even your butt. It's just a side effect of our hormones playing up, but even though we know it's normal to have acne, we can still feel incredibly self-conscious and everybody in the world is judging us.

I was such a self-conscious child. I was so busy trying to hide things I saw as defects. My big mouth, the braces I had for two years, the food that got stuck in said braces, and the huge pimples that would erupt on my face. Whenever I had a breakout, it felt like everyone was looking at it. Especially if I was already hot and sweaty, walking around in public felt unbearable. To me everybody was judging me. I was the center of everyone's negative energy, and it's really hard to get your head out of that space because it can feel exceptionally lonely. Luckily, I'm not the only one who has ever felt this way. Today, 23 year old Ashley Chow is sharing her tale about her struggle with acne.

[00:02:25]

Ashley: Growing up, my skin and my complexion wasn't something I ever really noticed or paid attention to. I would have older cousins complain to me that their pores were really big, and I would watch lots of movies where the girls were just complaining all the time about popping pimples or having breakouts, but it wasn't something I ever needed to concern myself with until I hit puberty.

When I was in year eight, I started to get these severe breakouts across my cheeks and my forehead. It felt like every time I woke up, there were just more red throbbing pimples were erupting overnight and there was nothing I could do about it. When I was 14, I was at this age where I didn't know a lot about makeup or concealer or foundation. There really wasn't anything I could do to cover it up. I remember this one time, I went out and bought mineral, loose powder foundation or something. I was 14, so I didn't know how to colour match myself. I had bought something that was completely white. I was born quite tan, so when I put it all over my face and went to school, it was quite obvious. I had tried to cover up my face because I looked like a ghost.

It always just made me feel really self-conscious, especially since it would always end up highlighting my pimples even more. It got to the point where I was always endlessly buying and using products that promise to clear out my skin in a day, or promise to give me picture perfect skin in three hours. I was always using these products and spending all this money and I would just wash my face all the time and constantly apply spot treatments just hoping to God that my skin would look beautiful the next day. The first thing I would always do was look at the media. Social media wasn't as huge back then when I was 14, but we had things Dolly magazine and Girlfriend magazine. I guess just seeing all these celebrities on the cover with perfect skin, I just thought that whatever products they're endorsing, I must have them too. I would just look through the pages of celebrity magazines or I would go into Priceline and look at the skincare section and just look for anything that said, "breakout or spot treatment." It was around the time when Proactiv was also quite popular, so there was Justin Bieber and Katy Perry and all these celebrities like, "Look at my face. My skin is clear, thanks to proactive."

I think when you're 14 and you're going through puberty and hormones, and you're starting to really boys, and you start to really want a boyfriend, I think acne just makes you feel so self-conscious and there must be something wrong with you. Whenever I would have conversations with people, I would start to avoid eye contact with them because I didn't want to see them looking at my pimples. So, I would just look at the ground, or just over their head, just not look at them at all. Obviously, it ended up hindering my confidence and just really impacting my ability to speak properly to people or even just put myself out there and try new things.

During this time, it just felt when you're at this age, all everyone cares about is their appearance and whether or not they're able to get a boyfriend or judging how pretty or ugly someone else is. I guess just hearing all these conversations in the schoolyard and within my group of friends, it made me feel so much worse. Especially since it looked like all my other friends weren't going through it at all. Maybe they would have one or two pimples here and there, but nothing compared to the volcanoes that were all across my face. I guess when you just see your friends and you feel they're looking so beautiful, and you look an ogre, it really, really impacts your self-esteem and how you go about life and how you approach relationships and people.

It got to the point where I just hated looking at myself in the mirror. I would literally get up, maybe brush my hair, but I wouldn't look in the mirror, and I would just go to school. Whenever I spoke to my mom about my acne, I would always just cry and complain about, "Why is this happening to me? Why am I cursed?" And she would always say like, "It's just a phase. It'll pass." But when you're 14, you don't believe that it's a phase or that it will pass. You think that high school is literally all that's ever going to happen to you in the world. Needless to say, it really impacted my self-worth and how I saw myself. Over time, this lack of self-worth really contributed to my well-being and even was, I guess, one of the causes of my depression.

Eventually as I got older, my hormones started to calm down and I started experiencing fewer breakouts. I ditched all the hyped products that promised miracles, and I also ditched the friends that made my appearance feel like it was everything. I ended up finding a really beautiful group of friends who showed me that my self-worth was just so much more than what I look and the number of pimples I had on my face.

I think the people you surround yourself with is the most important, especially during high school. I think, I always say to myself, "You are the sum of the five closest people you have in your life." You have to really think, "Okay, who do I have that’s speaking truth over my life? Are they the sort of people I want to become? Are they the sort of people I look up to? Or are they bringing me down?" Then I realized once I changed the group of people I was hanging out with, so people who cared more about changing the world, encouraging others, empowering others instead of trash talking other people. I realized those are the people I want to be and it just made me realize there was just so much more to life than always fretting about my pimples.

I'm now 23 years old, and I still get pimples on a daily basis. I even break out a lot in the week leading up to my period, during my period, and even after it. Pimples just happen 12 months of the year, and I still have a lot of the scars and the marks from old pimples and just marks that don't really want to go away. When I see a pimple now, I feel like pimples always just happen to appear at the worst moment. Like, when I'm about to go out to a party or when I'm about to go out on a first date or when I'm about to appear on camera, they usually just sprout. It's like the body knows that you're about to do something cool and you're about to face the public, so it just decides to-- It tries to help you, but really it just really hurts your confidence. When I do see a pimple I do still get upset because you see a blemish on your face and you're like, "Oh, no." I think the difference is I don’t see it as a definition of my worth or how beautiful I am. I just see it as, "Okay, there's now another red mark on my face. I'll have to spend maybe a bit more time covering up." Or sometimes I don't even cover it up. It depends on who I'm about to hang out with or where I'm about to go. I think there's something really refreshing about appearing in public, with no makeup and being just as you are.

I've absolutely come to love the way that I look now. Nowadays, when I look in the mirror, even though I see all these imperfections and marks, I just love the way that I look. I think that when you're younger, so many people are afraid to acknowledge that they love how they look because it comes off as narcissism or they're up themselves. I think that just loving the way that you look and just loving who you are as a person and who you were made to be, I think that's one of the most beautiful traits that you can actually have as a person and as a human being. I think that that's something we all need to start acknowledging more. I think nowadays when I look in the mirror, I don't even see the pimples and the marks, I see someone who is resilient enough to keep showing up to life, no matter how many storms she goes through. I see someone who has a great group of friends who don't care about superficial things and cares more about her values and her belief systems. I see someone who is just willing to just keep showing up to live her best life.

The way I reached my confidence is, I learned that no one is actually paying attention to my pimples. No one is paying attention to my acne or how I look. I think that people are inherently self-obsessed and that's not necessarily a bad thing, it's just that they're focused-- every one of us is focused on our own safety, our own comfort, our own dreams and desires and appearance. What that means is, we can let go of the pressure of appearing perfect in front of everyone because chances are they're not focusing on us. The things that we think are a big deal such as having acne or stuffing up or having an embarrassing moment, the chances are, no one is going to remember that because they're worried about themselves not stuffing up. I think once I realized that, I was like, "Okay, no one's looking at my acne, nobody cares, but nobody cares in a good way. It's fine, people care about me as a person and just because I have acne that doesn't diminish how they see me or how I should see myself."

The advice I would give to parents who currently have teenagers or children who are going through acne is, I would tell them to first validate their child's emotions. To just say like, "Yeah, I know you feel like you look ugly. Or I know you feel like no one else is going through this. I know you're in a tough spot right now." Because I think validation is so important. It's just one of those key things that helps someone process their emotions. By validating someone's emotions, you make them feel like it's okay to feel things that are not always happiness or joy. It gives them a safe space to process their feelings. Once they’re given that safe space, they can then start to think a little bit more rationally like, "Yeah, okay, maybe there is some truth in what my mom is saying. That maybe she is right in saying that it will pass." My first advice is always just validate your child's emotions. Then secondly, give them a story or your own experience about how you were once going through something, but then you made it through that and you lived to tell your tale. Because I think that hearing other people relate to you also makes you feel just 10 times better.

10 years on, I look back and I'm like, "Yeah, it was definitely a phase." I think I would tell my younger self that storms pass, this will too, and you are going to end up having the most beautiful life. So many wonderful things are going to happen beyond your imagination. You're going to find love, you're going to find friends, you're going to end up in a really great job. Everything that you've always hoped or desired, you will actually get if you just learn to just trust.

[00:14:41]

Sasha: As a teenager, it often feels like we can never catch a break. Just as we're getting the hang of high school, figuring out our friendship groups, and finally talking to our crush, fate intervenes and gives us acne. While pimples are those red bumps that pop up once twice in your skin, acne is a persistent skin condition that occurs when your skin gets inflamed and leads to lots of deep sore pimples often across your face, chest, and back. Why you ask? Why? Why? Why? We respond. Well, when we go through puberty, the changes in our hormones cause our body to start producing excess oil called sebum. Too much sebum can lead to your pores getting clogged, which traps dead skin cells and bacteria inside. This leads to redness, swelling, and eventually a breakout of pimples and blackheads.

As you get older, you may notice that pimples and breakouts start reoccurring around the week before you get your period or even during your period. This is known as PMS acne. When you're about to get your period, the progesterone levels in your body starts to rise and cause more sebum to be produced. Again, too much sebum leads to clogged pores on your face, which then lead to breakouts. When you get a breakout, it can be very tempting to pop your pimples or cover it up with a ton of makeup. But popping your pimples can actually lead to more inflammation across your face and even result in scarring. Putting makeup on can also clog your pores up even more and increase oiliness. Instead, it's best to adopt a simple skincare regime, such as gently cleansing your face at morning and at night and using an oil free moisturizer. But be careful not to get too caught up in the hype of products that promise clear skin.

I saw these ads for blackhead and nose strips and I was desperate to use them. I would keep buying and using them, but nothing would come out of my nose. Now, I actually do have blackheads and it's only because I kept pulling out my skin hoping for something icky to come up. Basically, if skincare or makeup products aren't working for you, it's best to stop overusing them. If you're still concerned about your skin, the best thing to do is please talk to your parents or someone you can trust who will refer you to a dermatologist. Because while dealing with acne can feel incredibly isolating and distressing, it's an experience that literally everyone goes through. Instagram’s face tune exists for a reason. It's nothing to feel ashamed about, and you certainly don't need to rush out and buy heaps of products to cover your face. You're beautiful and imperfectly perfect. No matter what.

We encourage you to keep showing up and living your best life, no matter how many pimples you have. The world needs to hear your laugh, see your smile, and enjoy your presence. Remember, like all our troubles in life, acne doesn't last forever.

Thanks for listening to The Red Tales, the Red by Modibodi Podcast. If you enjoyed this tuning into today's episode, related a bit too much to the story, or learn something new, please subscribe to our podcast and leave us a review. If you're curious about how Red by Modibodi underwear protects you against periods leaks, and you'd love to give it a try, visit the Red by Modibodi website at modibodi.com/red. You can even join the red squad by signing up on our website to receive exclusive VIP offers.

Because you've tuned in to our podcast today, we're giving you a special offer. That's exclusive only to our podcast listeners. Simply use our special code, PODCAST, and you'll get a 10% discount on any red product, excluding bundles. Lastly, to keep up with all things Red, make sure to follow us on Instagram at @RedbyModibodi. Remember, life is messy, but your period doesn't have to be.

End of Audio [00:18:58]

Episode 004: My First School Camp

EPISODE 004.
MY FIRST SCHOOL CAMP | TRANSCRIPT

[00:00:00]

Sasha: You're listening to the RED Tales, The Red by Modibodi Podcast, which candidly celebrates the messy and iconic parts of our teenage years, and our bodies. From juggling, changing friendship groups, dealing with those heartbreaks, and waking up to changing body parts, our teenage years are filled with the most defining and often cringe worthy moments of our lives. Luckily, we're not alone. Red by Modibodi is sustainable, easy to use period underwear for tweens and teens. It gives us the best protection against period leaks and stains so we can ditch pads and get on with living our best lives. I'm Sasha Meaney, your host, and every fortnight I'll be joined by a young Aussie, who isn't afraid to open up about the all too relatable moments from their teenage years and how they lived to tell the tale.

There comes a point in all our lives when we have to take a bold step out of our comfort zone and leave the safety of home. For many of us, that step starts with our very first school camp. The endless long bus ride to the middle of nowhere, having to stay in a room with six other kids, and sleeping on unfamiliar bunk beds can be a very confronting experience, especially if it's your first time away from home. The first time I went to a rehearsal camp, I was petrified. I didn't know anyone there. And the cast age range from about 10 to the late 20s. So, I was surrounded by adults, I was terrified of. Going on this camp was a huge step out of my comfort zone. But as the camp went on, I was able to make friends and I felt really supported by them. In the end, I'm glad I took this step as being surrounded by like minded people who were really cheering me on, helped me to be the confident person I am today. Someone who understands what it's like to put yourself out of a comfort zone and leave home for the first time is 22 year old Eleanor Henderson. Today she shares the tale of her very first school camp. Hello, El, and welcome to the Red Tales Podcast by Modibodi. How are you today?

Eleanor: I'm great, how are you Sash?

Sasha: I'm doing well. You're here to talk about your first time going to school camp.

Eleanor: So, yeah, I actually went to school camp in the UK not in Australia because I moved to the UK when I was about six years old. I was at boarding school. So, it wasn't really my first time away from home but it was more sort of, I just went to a new school when I was 13 and it was in a new boarding school and they took the entire year because no one knew anyone. So, I was in the Lake District for about a week. I found very like socially conscious, terrified, very young teenagers camping in the Lake District in the middle of winter. And then it got hurricane going on in the North of Scotland or something. It was like torrential rain,thunderstorms and everyone had these packs and like wandering around the Lake District doing all those orientation activities in small groups trying to make friends. It was an interesting experience. It was an odd time because everyone sort of just bonded insanely quickly. We were doing like high ropes or like when we got into some like caving situation, you were underground. We were in really small groups about six people. I guess the purpose was to get everyone to have a friend by the time school started, properly. Yeah, camp was fun.

Sasha: That's pretty extreme camp stuff.

Eleanor: Yeah, it was a pretty extreme school. I think also it was because no one knew anyone. So, the entire purpose was, I guess, to ensure that the year group would work together. It was a full boarding school so they wanted to make sure that we could all live together and we could all spend time together without killing each other. So, we arrived in the Lake District and it’s like prison dorms basically, like bunk beds, iron bunk beds and you’re given your group. And then we had to do everything for a week just with those seven people. The activities were just wild. Those are one night we went on--we had to go camping, it’s a big forest basically. One of the boys' tents flew off because of the weather, it was just insane weather and someone had stolen the pegs from Katie Ann's tent. And so, like 2am Katie Ann and Sam's tent went flying in the ether. It was like a bunch of 13 year old kids wandering around with torches trying to find this tent and the hurricane’s a few miles away. It was interesting. You made very close friends very quickly. They did stay friends for like the whole time there, which was at school.

Sasha: That would have been nice to kind of help you ease into…

Eleanor: So important. It's so terrifying. I think being completely separate from my… We are so dependent on social structures and people we love and things we know, our routines. When you're away from all of them, it's terrifying. Even having one of those that like, someone you have known for a long time is so helpful.

Sasha: Like a buddy that you can kind of--, that you're like, “Oh, we can talk about how uncomfortable we both are and just get over it.”

Eleanor: Yeah. And also, having a buddy there that you can talk to and can deal with the whole situation comfortably, so someone you're comfortable around to stress to and talk to. It's really helpful.

Sasha: So, you said that you moved to England for boarding school? So, what was that like? Where was your family at that time?

Eleanor: So, my parents travel a lot for their work. My father had got an opportunity, so we moved from Australia to the UK when I was six. And I have a twin brother, so we went together. I began boarding on and off from about seven and we were like fully full time boarding pretty soon after that. I think on paper it sounds quite terrifying, but again, having Rex there, having family with you the whole time makes it a lot easier. But also, I think people are so adaptable, home can be created so quickly. So, I think this idea of like homesickness is so in the moment and so overwhelming, but then so quickly, it goes away because you find structures and you find people you enjoy, and you find an environment that you can thrive in pretty quickly.

Sasha: Do you ever get homesick still, now? That was obviously you were a lot younger? Do you ever still experience the same feelings that you had when you were a teenager and kind of…?

Eleanor: Yeah, homesickness I don't think it ever goes away. I've spent probably the majority of my life away from home at this point. And there's never been a moment where I'm in a new environment that I'm not terrified. In the moment of arriving there, I think it becomes really easy to, I guess, define yourself and who you are, by what's around you, the people you love, your routines, your social structures, whatever it may be. So, when you're completely extracted from that and you lose touch a little of that, it's really confronting one just being with yourself and having that experience who you are and having to fully see who you are and, I guess, sort of unravel that, but also missing all stability. And that never goes away. You're never not gonna want to see your parents and want to know what to do.

Sasha: Are you somebody you would say that puts yourself out there in those situations on purpose, have you learned to thrive?

Eleanor: Yeah, it's really addictive. I like to go to places that you're probably not supposed to go like the Middle East. And like hitchhiking, and like Palestine or whatever it might be it does become… If you’re someone that enjoys risks, once you've experienced that type of risk it becomes quite addictive. I'm not sure school camp is the gateway to that. But I do think you find that part of yourself when you experience the first time, and that could be a school camp, or that could be going to boarding school, whatever it might be.

Sasha: But also what you were saying about you had a buddy you learned to put yourself out there with support. You don't go to those places without having told somebody first that you're going there.

Eleanor: It’s really important. Allow yourself to seek comfort and to ensure that your own safety, in whatever that may mean, whether it's emotional safety or physical safety. I think emotionally it's always helpful to have a parent to call or someone right there with you that you've known that you can be with. Prioritize yourself, that's important.

Sasha: It's very important. And being in boarding school and stuff like that, how did you kind of take care of yourself when you were emotionally feeling, maybe not 100%? What would you do to like--, you said, calling your parents?

Eleanor: I'm really lucky in regards to, whenever I felt completely out of sorts or in whatever situation, I've always had- my parents to call. I prioritized communication. I think having a parent to call is so vital for me in regards to like feeling secure and knowing that I can jump off the cliff if I can call moms and she will send a parachute eventually and I will be okay. Hopefully quickly. Having a parent to call. Also, I think, just, this sounds silly but meditation and centering yourself and finding yourself an internal sanctuary or something, a place in yourself where you can go that you feel safe. Whether that's meditating or just going to a happy place or music playing and finding different outlets where you can just cut your fears and being who you are for a moment really helps.

[00:10:28]

Sasha: How did you first kind of develop those skills because you're very calm? You’re crazy, but you are Zen like. So, how did you kind of develop those skills? Was it an independent thing?

Eleanor: Yeah. I'm very high energy but pretty low maintenance. I think you're forced to be adaptable when you're always put into different situations. You will be throughout your life. I think mine are probably more radical than most people. But I don't know anyone that hasn't experienced sort of being thrown out of their comfort zone repeatedly across the first 21 years of existence. And you're forced to adapt to the situation. I developed my, I guess, my methods of dealing with homesickness, because I was always away from home pretty quickly by the time I was 13 years old. That was an easy thing to do.

Sasha: When you went on your first school camp or when you first went to boarding school and you were faced with leaving home, how did you feel? Because by now when you put yourself out there, you have those skills, you know what you can do to kind of center yourself, but prior to that, what was your feeling?

Eleanor: I'm not someone that gets scared. So, when I first went to boarding school and school camp, I wasn't necessarily terrified that I was going to need to adapt. I don't really think forward very well. So, my mentality has always been to act as if everything's gonna be fine and it will be fine. Which sounds silly and dangerous but I'm still alive. I'm here, which is great. And also I've never really found that anything's going wildly wrong. If you're always in the headspace that you can figure it out and if you always, I think, find a confidence in yourself that like you will thrive no matter what, I think that's always been my mentality. And that causes issues and I forget problems and chaos.

Sasha: Well, I'm hugely impressed. Thank you so much for sharing El.
If you've never heard of the term comfort zone before, let's break it down, shall we? Your comfort zone is a space in your life, where your behaviors fit a pattern that minimizes stress and risk. Simply put, when you're in your comfort zone, you will feel safe, secure and in control because you're familiar with the environment, the people around you or your routine. Your comfort zone can be a physical place, like your own home or your cozy bedroom. But it's also a state of mind. For example, if you've played football since you were five, then the way you feel when you kick the footy around is in fact a comfort zone all of its own. While comfort zones can feel, well comfortable to be in, there are times we have to venture outside, literally, metaphorically or otherwise. Think about the time when you made the move from primary school to high school. By the time you hit grade six, you probably ruled the school, had a bunch of friends since prep, and knew exactly when the bell rang for recess. Oh, yes, grade six was the life but then plot twist. You entered high school and you have to be the new kid all over again. You may be feeling really anxious rocking up to the first day, not knowing who anyone is, where to find the classes or how to do the homework. That stressful feeling of not knowing what's going to happen and not being in control was you stepping out of your comfort zone.

So, you may be wondering if you're comfortable in your comfort zone, then why ever leave. Moving out of your comfort zone is scary because it involves a lot of risk and uncertainty. Psychologically, our bodies try and seek out comfort as much as possible. And they aren't huge fans of risk, which is why we feel so naturally and passively uncomfortable when we try anything new. But the lightning bolt moment moving out of your comfort zone really is the only thing that helps us to change and grow for the better. If we've always stayed in the same place all the time, we wouldn't get to try new things and experience all the cool opportunities life has to offer. We may never travel overseas, meet awesome people, discover tasty food or figure out what we're passionate about.

So, here are some simple ways we can break you out of your comfort zone. Try incorporating something new into your daily routine. Perhaps eat something different for lunch every day, or introduce yourself to someone from another class. You could even walk a different way to school or to work or try sitting at a new desk. Listen to different music. Go to the cinema by yourself. Another way is to try out new experiences. You can try out for different sports teams, audition for the school play. Ask your boss if you can learn something new or take on a different role. Try period underwear instead of always reaching the pads and tampons. Remember friends, your comfort zone is a beautiful place but nothing ever grows. There.

Thanks for listening to the Red tales, the Red by Modibodi Podcast. If you enjoyed tuning in to today's episode related a bit too much to the story, or learnt something new, please subscribe to our podcast and leave us a review. If you're curious about how Red by Modibodi underwear protects you against period leaks, and you'd love to give it a try, visit the Red by Modibodi website at modibodi.com/red. You can even join the red squad by signing up on our website to receive exclusive VIP offers.

Because you've tuned in to our podcast today, we're giving you a special offer that's exclusive only to our podcast listeners. Simply use our special code ‘podcast’ and you'll get a 10% discount on any red product, excluding bundles.

Lastly, to keep up with all things red, make sure to follow us on Instagram at Red by Modibodi. Remember, life is messy, but your period doesn't have to be.

[End of Audio - 00:17:00]

Episode 005: My First Period Underwear

EPISODE 005.
MY FIRST PERIOD UNDERWEAR | TRANSCRIPT

[00:00:00]

Sasha: You're listening to the Red Tales, The Red by Modibodi Podcast, which candidly celebrates the messy and iconic parts of our teenage years, and our bodies. From juggling, changing friendship groups, dealing with those heartbreaks, and waking up to changing body parts, our teenage years are filled with the most defining and often cringe worthy moments of our lives. Luckily, we're not alone. Red by Modibodi is sustainable, easy to use period underwear for tweens and teens. It gives us the best protection against period leaks and stains so we can ditch pads and get on with living our best lives. I'm Sasha Meaney, your host. And every fortnight I'll be joined by a young Aussie, who isn't afraid to open up about the all too relatable moments from their teenage years and how they lived to tell the tale.

When it comes to getting your period, you've probably been given the rundown on how to use pads, tampons, and even menstrual cups. But the thing about disposable pads and tampons is that they can be super fickle. You're always wondering about whether you have a spare pad in your back during emergencies. Tampons can be an absolute pain to insert. And you've probably stressed out about leaking and staining the bed when you go to sleep. Basically, they get in the way of us living our best life. But what if we told you there was a different way? On today's episode, 30 -year old Anna Khan shares her tale about the time she discovered an alternative solution to pads and tampons.

[00:01:50] Anna, thank you for joining us on the Red by Modibodi Podcast. How are you today?

Anna: I'm doing good today.

Sasha: That’s good.

[00:01:57] And you're going to be talking to us about your first time using period underwear. So, what's the story there?

Anna: Well, my first time using period underwear, actual proper period underwear with Modibodi was quite recent. But my original period underwear experience was- when I first got my period, I was 12. And I'm the oldest between me and my sister. So, I was the first one to get it. I knew it was coming because I'd read-- so, my cousin when I was younger gave me this book, it was this Judy Blume book and it was about these teenage girls that were just growing up and getting their periods and everything. So, I remember really vividly reading about what a first period would be like. And so, when I got it, I was like, “Oh my God, this is just like the book.” And I remember I told my mom and she was like, “Okay, well, we’ll get pads and put them on and everything.” And initially, it was such an experience getting used to what pads to use and what doesn't change and do I want wings, do I not want wings? And I guess everyone's experience is so different.

So, my mum's experience was so different to mine. She was like, “Oh, you don't need wings.” And then I was like, “But I need protection and comfort.” I think, especially for me, the more security that I have the more comfortable that I feel when I'm on my period. And so, when I first got it, during the day was fine because, I guess, you're sort of on your feet and you're straight up and the chance of leakage or anything that isn't that high. But I remember when I first got it, and I was like, “Okay, now I'm gonna go to sleep tonight.” And I went to sleep and I leaked and I was like, “Okay, is this gonna be what it's like once a month every month for the next 30 years?” Then I'm gonna be washing sheets every single time and being embarrassed and having to wake up and be like, “Oh, Mom, can you clean the sheets?”

And I remember I was 12, so my youngest sister at the time was like four or five, she'd sort of recently grown out of nappies and everything and because we're sort of hoarders we'd kept her stuff, just in case. And I remember I was like, “Maybe I should just wear a nappy to bed.” And so, I actually started, I guess they were the biggest size nappies because she had just grown out of them but still they’re not for 12 year olds. And they’re not incredibly comfortable either. I get why kids don't want to wear them, but at night I started wearing them. I started wearing nappies to bed because I was just so worried and because I just wanted all over comfort and protection and not to have to worry about like, I'm sleeping and then I'm waking up because I'm like, “Oh, did I leak anywhere?” And then getting up to go to the bathroom multiple times a night, especially when you're on your period, I think you're just also super tired, and also being in year seven at the time. It was a new high school experience and I just got my period and I just want to sleep.

So, I started wearing nappies to bed for the week of my period because I was just like, “There's no other way because the pads are not sufficient.” And it took me a while to be like, “What else can I do that isn't a nappy because it's not sustainable for me to keep buying nappies well into my teens to go through this week at a time?” And I had to come up with ways, sticking a wad of toilet paper behind my pad when I was going to sleep. And then I felt wasteful as well because it was just like taking these wads so toilet paper out and sticking them. And obviously, they're not super comfortable either, it's uncomfortable and the less plies you have the more uncomfortable it is. And it's against your skin. So, it's chafing everywhere. It was really unpleasant at the time to be doing that. So, I guess, recently when I discovered Modibodi, I kept getting sponsored ads for various pad and tampon alternatives. And I saw this one from Modibodi and I was like, “Okay, maybe I'll try it.” And then I went onto the website. I online shop a lot, but I'm super conscious of what's okay and what has good reviews and do they have an Instagram page? Have people commented and said, “Oh, I really liked this. Oh, it's been terrible.”

So, I do quite a bit of research before I get something. So, I did that. And I was like, “I want seam free full briefs, that's what I need for that time of the month.” And it was so funny because when they came, for the first time in 10 plus years of getting my period, I was like super excited to get my next period, because I was like, “I'm gonna be able to use these, I'm gonna be able to test them out.” And so, when I got my period, I was like, “Yes, I'm gonna put these on.” And I think I got the heavy overnight flow ones because I was not taking any chances and I tried them on and it is absolutely the first time I've actually felt comfortable on my period, comfortable sitting around on the couches at home, comfortable going to sleep at night, which is the biggest thing, not having the fear of, “If I lie in this position, is it gonna leak? Should I put dark sheets on? Do I have to worry that I've just put white sheets on my bed?” But it was just so great, and it was so comfortable. And I wake up in the morning I was like, “Oh maybe I’ve leaked. It can't be that good.” But it was all fine.

And then I wore something light colored to work the next day as well, because I thought let's test it out. Because ordinarily, for the week of my period, I'll just wear black pants, dark colored dresses, because I'm like, “Just in case something happens I don't want to be wearing yellow pants and have that be really obvious.” Because even now that it's been so long and I'm like, “I know what I'm comfortable with, I know how to deal with my period when I get it” I keep a track. I have a tracker on my phone as well. So, I know when I'm gonna get it and everything. I still, for that week, every time I get up off a seat I always check behind then I check the seat, it's just this paranoia, I guess of, “Is it okay?” And you never quite trust it. But when I wore these, I was like, “It's fine.” And after the first couple of days where I was like, “I'm a bit paranoid, is it gonna be okay?’ It was so good. And I started going on to every one of my little sister I was like, “They're really good and I'm gonna get you a pair and it's gonna change your life.” Because I think when I like something I really like it, so I'll go and tell everyone about it.

So, I start telling everyone and, especially, they're so comfy. And I guess I got the seam free one, so you can't even see them through anything. And the thing is, when I'm on my period, I'm super self-conscious as well, just extra self-conscious, I feel bloated. I feel things that normally fit me, don't fit right at the time. But they actually sort of, I don't know, they make everything look right as well, which is better than regular underwear. So, I was like, “Maybe I'll buy a few more pairs because I think I'd actually would just want to wear them on a day to day basis.” Because they just make everything look good and you feel really comfortable. And so, I was like, “Oh, I have to get some for my sister because she doesn't know what they're like and she's had me go on and on about them.” And a lot of the times I like something and she's just like, “I hate it.”

But I got some actually a couple of weeks ago, I was like, “I'm gonna get you a few different kinds, I’m gonna get you the full briefs and I’m gonna get you some boy legs, and you pick what you want to wear.” And she put them on while I was at work one day and she messaged me, it was all in caps, and she was like, “Oh my God, I've just put them on. This is the first day of the rest of my life.” That's the thing, I think when it suddenly feels like there's something that is actually going to change this significant part of your life, because I think girls get so used to, “It's going to be uncomfortable and I'm going to feel some level of pain.” I know some people don't feel pain at all. And for me, when I first started getting my period I didn't used to really get cramps or anything but as I've gotten a bit older, I’ve started getting cramps. And so, it's painful. So, you've got that element and then you've got the element of, “Oh, I have to sit right so that I don't leak anywhere and I'm uncomfortable and I'm bloated and I don't want to do anything.”

And I know that often stops me from doing things as well. I won't go to the gym the week of my period. I like doing spin classes and I just won’t do them because I am in pain, but also, I think the biggest thing is, I'm just worried. It's uncomfortable, so it's not as much as it is pain, but it's more, “It's gonna be uncomfortable and I probably won’t smell that great.” And that's the other thing it, I also don’t smell and I think that that's probably a big drawback for people, they probably feel like, “Oh, it might smell not great, how would it work?” But somehow it does. And I don't know how. And I don't need to know the science. I just need to know that it works. And for me it does in all those elements. It's comfortable and somehow scientifically it keeps the smell away as well. And then just easy to use and easy to wash and that really makes a big difference.

Sasha: Cool.

[00:12:09] Before you purchased the period underwear, what were any specific worries that you had about wearing them? I know the leakage was the reason why you purchased them, but did you have any other concerns that you were like, “Oh maybe, maybe not.”

Anna: I guess when I first got the period undies, there's a lot of places I guess that sell them. And I really didn't want to spend, first of all, a huge amount of money on something that I wasn't sure about was going to work. And so, the great thing about the Modibodi ones was that they were so reasonable to actually buy and they were easy to test as a first go. And I guess I was worried that they weren't going to do--, it's not that I guess I didn't believe what it said that it was going to do, but after so many years of being a certain way and having your period in a certain way you get used to it. There's certain things that you expect to happen, that you just get used to happening, being uncomfortable or double checking the seat when you get up or double checking your clothes when you stand up and things like that. So, I guess it's hard to believe that something's going to make you feel comfortable enough not to do that. It doesn't feel like it's going to happen. And so, I guess that was the main reason why I only bought one in the first instance because I thought if it doesn't do that, if it doesn't stop the leaks and it doesn't make me feel secure, then it'll be pointless to get more. But the very first time I was like, “This is it. This feels right.”

Sasha: This is my match, I found my perfect match.

Anna: Exactly, these were meant for me.

Sasha: And so, I'm assuming since then you've probably bought a lot more.

[00:13:53] How often do you reckon you're wearing them outside of your period? Do you just wear them literally all the time?

Anna: I have started wearing them outside of my period now. Because now that I sort of understand the heavy overnight ones aren't necessary for the whole time, because that was my paranoia in the beginning, I bought a few of different, I guess, absorbencies, so I can wear them at different points. Because initially, I was just like, “I'll save it for the first two days of my period, when it's the most concerning and then I just won't wear anymore.” And that was also because I only had one pair at the time. But after that first pair and after my first period, I was like, “No, that's it. I'm gonna buy them for the other days of my period.” The other days during this cycle, I guess, as well, like the middle of your cycle. And I guess different things mean that your body operates different ways throughout the month as well. And so, it's really useful and I've also really found that it is super useful for when you're doing things like going to events where there's portaloos and you feel kind of gross. And it just creates a sense of, you feel less disgusting somehow.

Sasha: I mean, either way, you're sitting in your blood.

Anna: Exactly.

Sasha:

[00:15:13] What do you think of the education, you mentioned you started with pads, tampons, and then you were leaking and you were like, “I don’t know what to do.” Ingenious idea with the nappy. What do you think about education at that age? Was that a conversation that you could have had at school? Do you wish that there had been a bit more going on in terms of, I guess it gets lumped into sex-ed, but you know, yeah.

Anna: Yeah, I don't really know, because I can't remember whether I got it right at the beginning. I think I did get my period right at the beginning of the year when I started year seven. So, you're not even really into learning about anything, probably at that point. And I guess when you do learn about those things in PE, it's one semester and it's kind of over and you don't get a huge load of information. They don't go through the specifics. And I went to a girl’s school, so there could have been more information. But you don't get the specifics of all these different pads. And different ones might work for you differently. The ones that have the cool packaging might not necessarily be the best for you, because that's what I was doing. I was 12 and I was like, “These ones look like the cool packaging, look awesome, and I'm gonna keep getting those.” And I was chafing so often. And then I was like, “Hang on a minute, I think I just need to get these big ones that just have the plain packaging, and they don't look that awesome.’ But it's not about that.

Sasha: It's about doing the job so that you can get on with it.

Anna: Exactly. It's about what makes you feel well enough to get through your day and through your week as you would any other week. So, it would be amazing. And I don't know what they do now at school, but I would hope that there's more education or I would hope that there's people that you can talk to about what are the different things I can use. I've got a little cousin who is 11. So, I think she's coming up to that point where she might get her first period. And I've just been waiting. I was talking to my mom about this and I said, “Oh, I think I'm going to tell her mom about the Modibodi undies because I don't know if that's gonna be too personal if she doesn't want advice, but I think it's worth knowing about if she doesn't know about it.” Because if I had had them when I first got my period and I was almost 12, it would have been so different. I wouldn't have had to go through the initial discomfort and I can be like, yeah laugh about wearing the nappies to bed and stuff, but I'm pretty positive at the time. I didn't really tell anyone that I was doing that at school, because I'm sure my friends were going through different ways of getting their first period as well, but I wasn't going to tell them that I was wearing nappies to bed. But there's other ways and you don't need nappies, you can wear something so much more comfortable. So, yeah, I would hope that there's more education and probably earlier on, because it would be nice to know how to deal with something that's coming before it actually happens, and to have the option of exploring different ways to deal with it before it happens. Again, for me, my cousin gave me that book that I read and I was like, “Okay, first period.” But I don't really remember having really discussed it prior to that. And I definitely don't remember learning about it at school, for the time that I was year five and year six, and maybe it happens and maybe it doesn't, but I definitely think having someone to talk to or having someone that's been through the experience and them giving you different support and ideas, because one thing doesn't fit everyone.

Sasha: Yeah, like different practical advice as opposed to being like, “Oh, this is a little world that you have to sort out for yourself kind of thing.”

Anna: Yeah, exactly. It would be really helpful to have practical advice.

Sasha: Well, thank you so much for telling us your story and moral of the story, no nappies.

Anna: Moral of the story; nappies are a total last resort now that I have these undies.

Sasha: So, you may be wondering, what exactly is the deal with period underwear? Are they just extra thick undies that you wear onto your pad? Do you wear them just to feel better? Red by Modibodi underwear is just like regular underwear but with a super innovative twist. Instead of having to worry about inserting tampons or running to the store to buy pads or accidental leakage, all you have to do is pop on a pair of period underwear and you're good to go. Each pair of red period underwear has special modifier technology that makes it super absorbent so you never have to worry about leaks or embarrassing stains. After you’ve used them, all you have to do is just take off your RED undies, rinse them in the sink with cold water and then toss them into the washing machine. Once they've been washed and dried, you can simply pop them back on. It's a good idea, then, to have a couple of pairs to get you through your period. What's great about period underwear, is that they're also better for the environment. While we might use a pad once, throw it away and never see it again, pads and tampons usually end up in the oceans where over 27,938 are collected. Or it ends up in landfill, where it takes over 500 years to break down. The first pad to ever be used probably still exists somewhere. How gross is that? Over our lifetime, it's estimated that each person with a period will use between 5000 to 14,000 tampons, and that's a whole lot of landfill. So, what's better, the gazillion pads, a trillion tampons or one pair of red undies?

Thanks for listening to the RED Tales, the RED by Modibodi Podcast. If you enjoyed tuning in to today's episode related a bit too much to the story, or learn something new, please subscribe to our podcast and leave us a review. If you're curious about how Red by Modibodi underwear protects you against period leaks, and you'd love to give it a try, visit the Red by Modibodi website at modibodi.com/red. You can even join the red squad by signing up on our website to receive exclusive VIP offers.

Because you've tuned in to our podcast today, we're giving you a special offer that's exclusive only to our podcast listeners. Simply use our special code ‘podcast’ and you'll get a 10% discount on any red product, excluding bundles.

Lastly, to keep up with all things red, make sure to follow us on Instagram at Red by Modibodi. Remember, life is messy, but your period doesn't have to be.

[End of Audio - 00:22:04]

Episode 006: My First Bra

EPISODE 006.
MY FIRST BRA | TRANSCRIPT

[00:00:00]

Sasha: You're listening to the Red Tales, The Red by Modibodi Podcast, which candidly celebrates the messy and iconic parts of our teenage years, and our bodies. From juggling, changing friendship groups, dealing with those heartbreaks, and waking up to changing body parts, our teenage years are filled with the most defining and often cringe worthy moments of our lives. Luckily, we're not alone. Red by Modibodi is sustainable, easy to use period underwear for tweens and teens. It gives us the best protection against period leaks and stains so we can ditch pads and get on with living our best lives. I'm Sasha Meaney, your host. And every fortnight I'll be joined by a young Aussie, who isn't afraid to open up about the all too relatable moments from their teenage years and how they lived to tell the tale.

It can be a shock to wake up and suddenly see your boobs for the first time. All of a sudden, it feels like the whole world has noticed that you now have two very defined bumps and you're wearing a bra. My first bra was from Target. It was a two pack of contrasting colors, a lime green and a light gray. There was a little apple symbol on the right. I remember just feeling that I was such a woman, a woman with a double A cup who could still fit a finger between my bra and my boob. I was disheartened, but I was not deterred. I had a bra now and I was going to show it to the world. Today, 21-year-old Libby Gunther shares her tale about the time she bought her first bra, and all of the feelings that come with discovering your boobs for the first time. Hi Libby, welcome to the podcast. How are you today?

Libby: I'm good. How are you?

Sasha: I'm well, I'm well. So, you're going to talk to us about your first bra experience, I guess, so like the body stuff.

[00:02:08] So, what's your story?

Libby: Perfect. Well, I guess to start off, I, when I was about 12, I started to notice that my boobs were growing and that they were a thing. And I think for me, it wasn't taboo in my house to talk about bras and puberty and starting to grow up, it was this awkward stage of not knowing whether to have a bra or not have a bra, which I think a lot of people go through. It's that in-between stage. And I vividly remember I was 12 and I went to this hip hop dance meet and greet, because I was very into hip hop at that time. And I was wearing a tank top. Do you know that full on look with the slap back caps and the white tanks on and it was very body hugging. And at that time, I was like, “I'm fine.’ You're quite free and you don't think about that kind of stuff. And then I looked back on photos and I went, “Oh, wow, I have breasts, they’re starting to grow.” And I saw it through the T shirt.

And I was so embarrassed at the time. I was like, ‘Wow, I just went in front of all these people.” And I went up and I full on did a little dance in front of everyone and everything. And looking back on photos, I'm like, “Wow, how come I did that, because I needed to wear a bra at that point in my life.’ And after that, I guess I went, “Okay, time to get a bra.” My first bra experience. And for me, I had an older sister and she was quite cool in my eyes. And so, I looked up to her and I remember her going to get her first bra and mom pulling her by her teeth trying to get her in there. And she's like, “Mom, don’t. I can’t.” And for me, it was kind of the opposite. I saw my sister go through it. And I thought, “That's so exciting. She's becoming an adult and it's all this freedom comes with that.’ And so, I went, “All right, I’m excited. Let's go to mom.” And when I got there, I started trying on bras and I was like, “Great.” And I think everyone starts off with a training bra, the quite simple bras. And I was a double A. And at the time, I thought that was so big and I was like, “Wow, look at me go, I fit into a double A, I'm such an adult. I'm turning into a teenager now.”

And then, I guess, I went to school. And that's where, I think, my idea of having a bra on my body definitely changed. Because you're in the locker room, you're looking at all the other girls and they've got bigger breasts than you. And at the time I didn't think that I had really small breasts, but as the rest of my cohort started to grow and started to have D cups or C cups, and I was still at the double A and I'm sitting there going, “Oh, maybe my body isn't the same as everybody else.” You feel me? And so, I definitely struggled with that side of things and starting to own my own body. And I think I noticed that my bra was a different size to everybody else, which kind of did affect me in a way. And as I got to year 14, 15 you start looking at social media and you see the Kardashians, all these other people with big boobs and big butts and you're thinking, “Oh, am I not feminine enough?” And then that comes into it because you're like, “Am I not a female enough because I don't have big boobs?” I definitely struggled with that for a while, but I think I came to terms with it because I looked at my friends who did have big boobs and they had so many problems. And I had problems of my own and different insecurities, but so did they.

So, everyone's going through it. You've got girls that have really big boobs, that have back problems, they can't fit into clothes properly because it like bunches. And then on the opposite side of that, as someone with smaller boobs, sometimes you can't fit into clothes because they're too big in places. So, I definitely think there's pros and cons to all different sizes and everyone is insecure and everyone's going through it. So, you can't judge yourself too hard.

Sasha:

[00:06:14] What was your first bra buying experience like in a little bit more detail? You went with your mom, you went to a department store, I'm assuming?

Libby: Yes, I went to a Target, that was very important. So, when I went for my first bra shopping, I went to Target with my mom. And we were looking through all the bras and I thought they were so pretty and I was looking at kind of the more, not the training bras because you got the training bras which are just normal with your whites, your blacks, your grays. And then I remember looking at all the other bras and getting so excited for the day where I can wear more of the adult bras, not in that way, but just the pretty ones, just not the training bras. And I saw the pretty bars and they've got flowers on it now and I went, “Ugh, that would be fun one day.” And so, it wasn't a negative thing because I don't think you should view that as a negative thing, it's all about growing up and learning how to love yourself. It's exciting, you've got something new, it's different for you.

Sasha: Well, that's the thing. I think it's fun and it's so difficult because you can feel like it's some kind of comparison or some kind of requirement you need to feel but like you said, so excited to wear the flowers one day.

Libby: Yes, exactly. I was so excited to see those flowers on me one day.

Sasha:

[00:07:31] So, you've described like very early on in high school and stuff, getting older, how did your ideas of body image change? You mentioned images like the Kardashians and social media and stuff like that, but how would you say you kind of got over those assumptions of femininity?

Libby: I definitely think that for me getting over the images of the Kardashians and getting over my own in security definitely came from looking at my peers and realizing we're all in this together, and I’m quoting High School Musical here, but we are all in this together. And everyone is going through it. You're not alone. I think what I would say to my younger self is to be patient, it's gonna come, you're not alone, your peers are going through it. It's all part of growing, they're going to change throughout your whole life. You're going to go through different bra sizes, you're going to fluctuate when you have babies, it's all part of life. And don't view your body or boobs, I guess, as a sexual thing. They're there and they've got a purpose, but they don't need to be over sexualized or you don't need to think about them in that way and compare yourself to other people.

Sasha: Well, yeah, because they're yours.

Libby: Yes, exactly. No one else has them.

Sasha: There you go. They’re specifically your boobs.

[00:08:55] Do you and your friends talk about bra-wearing nowadays? I know I've got a bit of a reputation for not wearing a bra. My nickname was flasher once. So, what do you think, now that you're older, what are the different conversations around boobs and bras?

Libby: I think now as an adult, the conversation has definitely shifted. I think when we're younger it seems taboo to talk about it, “Oh, we’re not going to talk about that subject.” But now as adults, when we go over for a sleep over, we’re all showing each other our bras, “I just got this bra, it's amazing. You have to see it. Oh, it's on sale, go here.” And we kind of compare, not in a bad way, in a great way and be like, “You look great.” I remember I've had so many times with my friends where we're having just a girls night and someone might be insecure about how their boobs look or like, “Oh, they're not big enough.” And I'm like, “No, you look great.” And we try and really encourage each other. And I think that's something to think about when you're younger. It's going to change the conversation about bras, it’s going to change with your friends and it's going to become way more open and honest as well.

Sasha: Yeah, absolutely.

[00:10:04] And you mentioned, sorry, I'm going all the way back to your hip hop days. When you saw these photos, was it this sense of like, “Oh my gosh, everyone was looking at me.”

Libby: Definitely. When I was doing that hip hop routine and I saw those photos, I went, “Wow, I can't believe I went up there and did that, everyone's gonna be seeing them.” I was completely unsure. I felt really vulnerable. I think that's the main thing, you feel vulnerable and like you've done, I guess not done something wrong. But that you should have dressed differently, which is not a fun thing to experience when you're 12. I don't think any 12-year-old should feel that way. And definitely it is a weird stage where you sort of have breasts and you sort of don't and you're not sure whether, “Should I wear a bra, should I stop wearing a bra or shouldn't I wear a bra.” And I think wearing a bra should come when you are comfortable with it, when you feel like you're like, “Yes, I think it's time for me to get that.” Not before or after because it doesn't really matter. Like you said it yourself, you cannot wear a bra. A lot of females now don't wear a bra, which there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. There's no problem wearing a bra and not wearing a bra, it's your choice.

Sasha: Yeah, my grandma told me that my boob muscles would get lazy if I did wear a bra, so that’s why I don’t wear one now. And I think that's the thing is that it really is what you're exposed to at a young age that, in the beginning, at least, when you start forming those ideas of like, how am I going to hold my body in a certain way? You know what I mean?

Libby: Oh, definitely. I went to an all girls’ school, so being around females all the time, you're going to talk and see that sort of stuff a lot more and it becomes a lot more open as well because there’s no guys around, you can talk about whatever you want at lunchtime. So, yes definitely impacted the way I think my bra journey was. It went back and forth. And I think like anyone, your journey with yourself, it goes from really loving yourself to sometimes you have bad days and you're like, “Oh, no, I don't quite love it.” But at the end of the day, it's what you've been given. And it's also like what's on the inside that counts, not really the outside.

Sasha:

[00:12:29] What kind of acceptance do you think you've reached now? What do you love about yourself?

Libby: I love a lot of things about myself, as should everybody, but I definitely have accepted my size and the way I look and it's me, it's no one else and it's definitely I love the fact that I can fit into some clothes and they fit quite well because I don't have that problem and I don't have to wear like three sports bras. And I'm thankful for that. I think you need to look at what you have and what other people have and be thankful for what you have and be appreciative of what you've been given.

Sasha: Yeah, for sure.

[00:13:11] And as you guys were growing up and you guys were becoming self-conscious and stuff like that, was it weird to hear different opinions about that kind of image, the body image that you wanted? Like when you were younger, was that a conversation where people were like, “Oh my God, I want to look like this way. I want to look like that way. This is how I'm going to do it.” Was that kind of a dangerous territory for you in an all girls’ school?

Libby: I definitely think as being in an all girls’ school, we did talk a lot about that stuff and where we would compare ourselves to famous people and say, “I really want to look like that one day.” And there are people that have really struggled with that subject of body image. I definitely have myself. I felt like not having big boobs, maybe draw attention to other areas and I felt like, “Oh, if I have bigger boobs, maybe everything else will be smaller.” And that's talk that's not effective or helpful for you. And that definitely did happen a lot. People compare their bodies all the time, especially in high school. You see a lot of girls going through eating disorders or other things like that just to fit a certain body type and you're in high school, you should enjoy it. You shouldn't be worried about how you look.

Sasha: Yeah. You mentioned you have a sister.

Libby: I do.

Sasha:

[00:14:33] Do you guys look similar or do you guys have fun in your different individual styles?

Libby: Definitely, us having a sister, I've definitely been inspired by her. And as I've grown up, I've emulated her sometimes, when you're like, “I love that shirt that she's wearing. Okay, I'm gonna go buy a shirt that’s similar.” And now as adults, obviously, we're very different, but we love going shopping together. We love going bra shopping together, we love going, “Oh, you have a really nice bra.” She'll go to Myer and pull out her really nice new bra and I'm like, “Wow, that's amazing. I need to get one.” And she's like, “Go to the sale.”

Sasha:

[00:15:13] Did she come to your first bra buying experience?

Libby: I don't think she did, from memory. I think it was just me and my mom, because she got very embarrassed by that stuff. And she was like, “No, I don't want to come, no.” And I think we had very different experiences, which is like many people, they either love going bra shopping or they hate going bra shopping with their moms. But unfortunately, mom has the money, so you have to go with her.

Sasha: And it's always good to have someone in there who knows what they're doing with a bra, because I tried to buy a huge one thinking that I could fill it,but nah.

Libby: That always happens.

Sasha: Always happens. Well, thank you so much for sharing your story.

Libby: No worries, thanks for having me.

Sasha: That comes a point in our teenage life, where it feels like everyone is obsessed with boobs. You may wake up one day and see two lovely lady lumps that weren't there the night before or you may notice that all your friends have sprouted boobs while you're still flat-chested. Firstly, it is not a race, we all develop our boobs at different rates. And just because you haven't seen any growth yet, doesn't mean there's something wrong with you. It might just mean that it took longer for puberty to kick in, or it could be because of your genes. Remember, boobs take around three to five years to grow. So, just be patient, you will catch up.

Secondly, boobs are weird and wonderful and they come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. They can be round, they can point in different directions, be different sizes from the other, look like teardrops and so much more. There's no such thing as normal boobs.

When I was in high school, my friend and I started talking about our boobs a lot. I'd started getting hairs on my nipples and I was feeling very insecure. My friend was also feeling weird about her boobs because they were feeling very sensitive. I remember, we counted down to five and then we showed each other. I was in shock. All I could think was why were her boobs not hairy? Why were her nipples so small and dainty? Now that I'm older, I've come to accept my boobs for what they are. Sometimes my double A boobs sag a bit, sometimes I think they're pointing in different directions and other times, I think they're cute as hell. Even after you’ve finished puberty, the size of your boobs can keep changing size, thanks to the hormones during your period, lifestyle changes or the changing of the wind.

Speaking of periods, you may also notice that your boobs start to hurt around your time of the month. During the first two weeks of our cycle, rising levels of estrogen can make our boobs slightly bigger, while rising levels of progesterone can make your milk ducts puff up. This ends up making up boobs really tender and sore. To help with soreness, it is really important to wear a bra that fits correctly. As tight or loose fitting bras can make you feel worse. Most places that sell bras offer a free fitting service. And no, it is not as scary as it sounds. When it comes to our changing bodies, it's important to know that we're all unique, and the size of your boobs doesn't make you less beautiful.

Thanks for listening to the RED tales, the RED by Modibodi Podcast. If you enjoyed tuning in to today's episode related a bit too much to the story, or learn something new, please subscribe to our podcast and leave us a review. If you're curious about how RED by Modibodi underwear protects you against period leaks, and you'd love to give it a try, visit the RED by Modibodi website at modibodi.com/red. You can even join the red squad by signing up on our website to receive exclusive VIP offers.

Because you've tuned in to our podcast today, we're giving you a special offer that's exclusive only to our podcast listeners. Simply use our special code ‘podcast’ and you'll get a 10% discount on any red product, excluding bundles.

Lastly, to keep up with all things red, make sure to follow us on Instagram at Red by Modibodi. Remember, life is messy, but your period doesn't have to be.

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